The Sacrament of Marriage

"The family, which is founded and given life by love, is a community of persons: of husband and wife, of parents and children, of relatives. Its first task is to live with fidelity the reality of communion in a constant effort to develop an authentic community of persons."

Pope John Paul II (1981)
Apostolic Exhortation on the Family, #18

Preparation Check List for Engaged Couples

Marriage Preparation

The family at Mary, Queen of Peace and the Catholic Church would like to congratulate you on your decision to embrace the sacrament of marriage. The sacrament of marriage should not be undertake without due consideration. The splendor of the sacrament includes much more that a ceremony on your wedding day. The Catholic Church has prepared a process intended to help you understand and enjoy the sacrament of marriage. Mary, Queen of Peace is looking forward to helping though this process.

To be married in the Catholic Church, one party to the marriage must be Catholic and both must be free to marry, i.e. either not previously married, or if one was previously married, he/she has received through the Catholic Church a declaration of nullity for that previous marriage.

For more information please contact Zoltan Abraham at 425.391.1178, ext. 117 or adulted@mqp.org.

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The Scarament of Marriage

The matrimonial covenant, by which a man and a woman establish between themselves a partnership of the whole of life, is by its nature ordered toward the good of the spouses and the procreation and education of offspring; this covenant between baptized persons has been raised by Christ the Lord to the dignity of a sacrament.

The intimate community of life and love which constitutes the married state has been established by the Creator and endowed by him with its own proper laws. . . . God himself is the author of marriage."The vocation to marriage is written in the very nature of man and woman as they came from the hand of the Creator. Marriage is not a purely human institution despite the many variations it may have undergone through the centuries in different cultures, social structures, and spiritual attitudes. These differences should not cause us to forget its common and permanent characteristics. Although the dignity of this institution is not transparent everywhere with the same clarity, some sense of the greatness of the matrimonial union exists in all cultures. "The well-being of the individual person and of both human and Christian society is closely bound up with the healthy state of conjugal and family life."